Arts in Recovery Documentary Screening

Creative Regions’ Afloat project has drawn to a close, and a screening of their recent documentary called Arts in Recovery will be broadcast on 31 Digital tonight on the 18th March at at 7pm, and again on Friday the 20th March at 9.30am and Saturday the 21st March at 5pm.

The Afloat project was a participatory arts projects initiated by Creative Regions in two stages in 2010/11 and 2013, and received funding through the Creative Recovery – Building Resilience initiative of the Queensland Government. An overview of Afloat can be found at this link. And a further description is available on Placestories in the Creative Recovery Network community:

“Afloat is a Creative Regions project funded through the Creative Recovery – Building Resilience initiative of the Queensland Government.  The project is occurring across the Rockhampton, Gladstone, Bundaberg, North Burnett and Fraser Coast Regions in response to the natural disasters of January 2013”

(http://placestories.com/project/145378).

I was fortunate to be able to attend the premiere of the documentary at the Judith Wright Centre for Contemporary Arts in December last year. It is powerful and emotional documentary, and demonstrates just how important the Arts are in disaster recovery work.

To discover more about arts in disaster recovery work, it is worthwhile tuning in to see this important documentary.

New England and North West Sound Trails

Another exciting storytelling project that is up and running is the New England and North West Sound Trails. The app for this project will be launched in June, 2014.

The sound walks started as an idea 2 years ago when members of the Uralla community decided to record conversations and tell stories about their town. These stories, conversations and memories will now form the first part of the New England and North West Sound Trails and is called the Uralla Sound Walk. A link to the first stories can be found here: Uralla Stories.

For further information, please also check out this link to The Story Project. This provides a platform for members from the community to tell and share their stories.

This is an exciting and creative project, and we will keep you posted. Make sure to ‘like’ the project’s Facebook Page to keep up to date on the project’s progress and developments.

 

Uralla Story Sound Walk

As part of the Co-Creative Communities forum last November, we also ran a project development lab. One of the highlights of the day was Uralla Story Sound Walk, a hybrid media project bringing together folk from oral history initiative The Story Project, and Uralla Arts, the local arts collective.

The Sound Walk represents the next stage of The Uralla Story Project, bringing the audio pieces already recorded out into the community in the form of a creative audio-tour you can access on your smart phone. It will let locals and visitors discover more about the tiny New South Wales town, its history and its community.

This is how the team describe the project:

Imagine you are walking around the centre of town with your mobile, and suddenly you hear music, then a voice starts telling you stories from the past. This idea is to bring Uralla stories alive in the street by creating a sound walk that you can listen to on your smart phone. The stories are told by Uralla locals, woven in with music, myths, poetry and sounds from local artists and writers. It’s a first in regional Australia.

The team behind Uralla Story Sound Walk have had a very busy time since we last saw them in November.

After wrangling additional Council and community support, and securing most of the funding, the last stage of the project looks ready for lift off.

If you like the, erm, sound of Uralla Story Sound Walk, then make sure you vote for their project at: http://www.heartofourcommunity.com.au

Andrew Parker from Uralla Arts says “Each vote gets us a $ amount and gets us closer to the project happening. I met yesterday with a regional tourism rep who is now interested in looking at a regional application of this project after Uralla gets up. This would really put the arts and artists in this region on the map. So it is all very exciting.”

Recent Highlights from the Twitterverse.

Community Uses of Co-Creative Media’s Twitter stream has been going for a few months now, so we thought it would be a great idea to post a roundup of what is out there with digital storytelling and co-creative media practices in the wider community and around the world.

Recent highlights include a story from the well known StoryCorps, with a Kickstater campaign to fund a TV series of their animated digital stories. This looks really interesting, and the use of crowd funding is quite a fascinating idea, as it allows potential audience members to invest in the program that they will eventually watch. So, both the audience and storytellers are involved in getting it on the air.

Another very interesting piece of information is the recent post on the research of The Future of Storytellingconducted by Latitude 42 via the CBX Twitter feed. This research emphasised:

“1. How are audiences’ expectations around storytelling evolving as media experiences become more multiplatform, more customizable, and more participatory?

2. How can content creators and technologists make stories come alive, by allowing audiences to delve deeper into them or by bringing them out into the real world?

3. What are some best practices and new opportunities for the future of storytelling?”

Reference: CB Online http://www.cbonline.org.au/the-future-of-storytelling/ 

Another great community project is the The Creative Recovery Pilot Project. This is fantastic. It is a 16-month initiative across three communities, including the regions of Ipswich, Lockyer Valley and Cassowary Coast in Queensland, that were hit hard by recent flooding and natural disaster in 2010-2011. It is really worth checking out, and to also see how stories have been shared on the online platform by Feral Arts called Place Stories.

One really interesting, and well publicised use of community co-creative storytelling, is the recent National Geographic collaboration with the people of the Pine Ridge Reservation. By using the Cowbird Storytelling Platform, this allowed both the magazine and the community to tell their stories unfiltered, and to share these with the world.

The Information and Cultural Exchange’s (ICE) recent blog post The Empowering Nature of Storytelling and self esteem, also shared a wonderful short summary of the Koori Kinnection Project, and the great things that storytelling has done for young people with the telling and sharing of digital stories and similar creative practices.

This is only a short collection of the wonderful projects that are out there, and we will be posting many more regular round ups and highlights of such great projects and initiatives that we come across via Twitter and other online travels.